3 useful tips for those who don’t have time for anything

Now everyone is talking about time management, and every other person knows what time management is. But does this knowledge help you cope well with everyday tasks and work tasks? Or do you have the feeling that you are an automaton, not a person? And do you have time to do the things you really […]

time management

Now everyone is talking about time management, and every other person knows what time management is. But does this knowledge help you cope well with everyday tasks and work tasks? Or do you have the feeling that you are an automaton, not a person? And do you have time to do the things you really enjoy? Or are you so tired that you collapse without energy every day?
Workbook “Planning” from the series “Simple Practice” helps you deal with your time eaters and find the right “techniques” time management is for you. Try doing a few exercises.

What are your days filled with?

Draw seven dials and mark on them how much time you usually spend on your chores. Try to be as accurate as possible about the time it takes you to get up, get ready for work, eat breakfast, travel time, work, sports, eat, sleep. Do this for each day of your “regular” week. And then draw seven new dials and write down what you would like to do all week.

Now we need to answer the questions:

  • What conclusions did you draw after doing this exercise?
  • What will you change?
  • When?
  • What will be your first step?

If the graphs are drawn are very different from each other, ask yourself: what exactly can you do to do at least a few minutes less of what you don’t like and a few minutes more time to devote to what you do like. This will help you to be active. Which usually automatically entails subsequent changes.

Create habits.

For many activities, it makes sense to incorporate them into your life as routine tasks (or rituals). Rituals have one important advantage: They can be done when the moment is right. In addition, you’ll save time coordinating with others.
What are some of the activities you can and want to turn into rituals? For example, doing laundry on Thursdays, always going to yoga on Wednesdays. Determine at what time to schedule the routine, and what will be the benefit to you personally after the creation of these rituals.

The magic word that saves time

And that word is “no.” Have you ever wondered how much time would be saved if you didn’t do everything others want you to do? In response to a request to do something, we say “yes” more often than we would like to. And then the time we spend on these tasks is wasted. Find out why you rush to say “yes” even when you don’t want to.

  • In what situation have you had to say “yes” even though you wanted to say no?
  • What circumstances prompted you to say yes?
  • What was the reason you had to say yes?
  • What were your reasons?
  • How did that make you feel?
  • How was the task accomplished?
  • How did this assignment benefit you?
  • What negative things did it reveal to you?
  • What did you have to give up because of it?
  • What would have happened if you had not performed the assignment?
  • How could you have tactfully avoided an unpleasant situation?
  • Why do these situations recur?
  • What tends to make you want to say yes?
  • What will you do in the future to say no?

Say to yourself, “I promise myself that I will henceforth say ‘no’ in the following situations in order to be able to focus on the goals and objectives that are important to me…”

“The funniest desire is the desire to please everyone,” said Goethe. As the authors of “The Maximally Useful Daily Book” (which, by the way, helps to implement weekly useful habits to increase productivity) write, the ability to say “no” is a very important and challenging skill – to say “no.” What will it do?

  • You will begin to refuse activities and meetings that have no value to you, but from which you do not feel comfortable refusing to participate.
  • You will not communicate with those who you do not like, who complain to you about life and their problems, instead of solving them.
  • Give up bad habits and meaningless pastimes.

Always make informed choices. As in any business, the hardest thing here is to start, and the best training is practice. It can be hard at first. Remember that people take rejection much more easily if they hear a reason – and it doesn’t have to be a good one. It’s a difficult task to put on your schedule, but remember this advice at all times.

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